Did you know about this OSHA regulation?

OSHA requires that your plan-of-action include a way to alert employees – including disabled workers, to evacuate or take action, and how to report emergencies.

Let’s break this down:

1. How do you alert employees including workers who may be hearing impaired? Try a dual Audible and Visual Signal Light that blasts a warning but also blinks brightly enough to catch everyone’s attention.

2. Evacuating and taking action is the easy part! Line your evacuation route with Exit Signs and Glow in the Dark Tape. Do not block fire extinguishers so they are easily visible. Establish a meeting place outside the building and make sure all employees know where it is and to whom to report once they get there.

3. Create an easy and fast way for employees to report emergencies. This procedure works well: in each department, identify an emergency point person and a backup.  The emergency point person is in charge of his/her department roster and ensures all employees from the department have left the building and arrived at the evacuation point. This person should also be the first point of contact for reporting emergencies.  Your emergency point person will contact the other departments to report the emergency and from that point, your company will begin to follow your emergency evacuation plan.

Follow the simple steps above to instantly comply with OSHA regulations.  Avoid fines or worse- injuries and lost time.

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The importance of glow in the dark material

Above are a series of photos showing a stairwells and an exit door in light and dark conditions. In each of these photos, you can clearly see the use of Emedco’s Glow-In-The-Dark Tapes and a couple Glow-In-The-Dark Signs.  The difference between the photos in the light and in the dark are striking – the Tapes are so bright, no other light is needed in the darkened stairwell.  During an evacuation, every second is crucial -by choosing products that glow in the dark, you’re making your exit routes safer for every person in your building.

What do the metric system and European pictorial Exit Signs have in common?

Green "running man" Exit Sign

…neither will likely be used by the United States although they’re used by most of the world. In an article by Julia Turner, the US is nearly alone in its use of red-lettered Exit signs, just as we’re alone in using miles instead of kilometers.

The rest of the world uses the “running man”, a pictorial sign showing a man running through a door – in green – the international color meaning “go”, and in this case GO NOW! Tuner says, “In most places in the United States, its safe to assume people speak English…our sign systems have typically communicated in text. Europe, by contrast, developed symbolic road signs…On a continent where you can’t drive more than a few hours before encountering a new language, the pictorial approach made sense.”

The red Exit sign was developed in 1911 after a fire in a garment warehouse killed 146 workers because exit doors were bolted shut but also not clearly marked. Although the US began adopting pictograms on a smaller scale in 1974, the Exit sign remained in text. The current “running man” sign was created by a Japanese designer named Yukio Ota, whose design beat out a very similar design by a Soviet designer. Neither knew the other design was a man running through a door, meaning the rest of the world was already thinking in pictorials.

Turner interviewed a prominent member of the NFPA who says the National Fire Protection Association sees no need to change the red lettered Exit sign used in the United States. Although we may never switch from text to pictogram exclusively, some areas are requiring both signs to be posted. New York City changed its building codes for high rises in 2006 to include the “running man” on all fire doors.

Luckily for Emedco customers, we offer both the standard, familiar text Exit Sign, and the widely accepted “running man” pictogram sign. It’s my opinion that until the green “running man” is more widely accepted in the United States, you should stick to NFPA’s guidelines and place red-lettered text Exit signs in your facility. But, who knows – maybe labeling your exit doors with the green man will start the trend that gets him racing across our country.

Create a safe haven with Evacuation Assembly Area products

Where do your employees gather after an evacuation?  Most stand in the parking lot away from the building, some go their cars, some wander around the premises… it’s almost impossible to keep track of everyone unless you have a well-organized Evacuation Assembly Area. Easily account for everyone in your facility when every employee is required to meet at a safe spot far away from the building and emergency crews.  A good Evacuation Assembly Area will include bright bold signage at the designated assembly point, traffic cones and barricade tape to block off hazards and dangerous areas, and lightsticks in case the environment is dark due to time of day or smoky conditions. It’s best to be proactive about your emergency training – ensure each employee is required to attend emergency procedure training once a year.  Provide plenty of practice opportunities and appoint certain employees Evacuation Leads.  These small and simple steps will protect your workforce from any emergency situation.

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Emedco carries the safest glow-in-the-dark material in the industry

SuperGlo is the brightest, safest glow material on the market that is applied to the top of an Emedco exit sign for added safety in the most dire conditions. It is a non-toxic, non-radioactive ultra-safe glow-in-the-dark film.  The film charges in 5 minutes by natural or fluorescent lighting and does not require electricity to glow for over 30 hours.  SuperGlo material is perfect for reducing energy costs and is eco-friendly, non-toxic and non-radioactive, making it safe for any employee to handle.  By adding SuperGlo topcoat to your Exit Sign, it instantly exceeds all international building code standards.  SuperGlo topcoat features advanced Photoluminescent technology which means it absorbs and stores light for a long-lasting glow-in-the-dark effect.  In the middle of an emergency when evacuation is crucial to the survival of your employees, SuperGlo Exit Signs outperform standard Exit Signs that disappear in dark conditions.